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Pupil Premium Strategy 2016/17


1. Summary information

School Whitehouse Primary School
Academic Year 2016-17 Total PP budget £116,460 Date of most recent PP Review N/A
Total number of pupils 177 Number of pupils eligible for PP 89 Date for next internal review of this strategy July 2017


2. Current attainment

Based on Key Stage 2 results for mainstream pupils in 2016

Pupils eligible for PP
(National Average)

Pupils not eligible for PP
(national average)

% making progress in reading 90.9% (53%) 60% (72%)
% making progress in writing 63.6% (67%) 60% (79%)
% making progress in maths 72.7% (57%) 60% (60%)
Average Scale Score:  Reading 99.9 (99.8) 109.6 (103.8)
Average Scale Score:  Mathematics 94.6 (100.6) 106 (104.0)

 

3. Barriers to future attainment
(for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

A.

SEND:  47 (28.6%) pupils have been identified as requiring SEN support in school this compares to a national average of 12.1%.  We have a further 7 (4.3%) pupils that have a statement or EHCP compared to a national average of 1.3%.  SEN needs vary across the cohort and from class to class but we have seen a significant increase in speech and language support across all years but most particularly in Foundation Stage.
B. Attainment on Entry:  Many of our pupils enter FS 1 below the expected levels for their age, only 45% of pupils attained a good level of development on leaving foundation stage compared to 66% nationally.  We have seen a three-fold increase in the number of children identified with Speech, Language and Communication needs from 2015 to 2016.  Year 6 pupils entering Year 6 in 2015-16 had an APS of 12.8 compared to a national average of 15.7.   35% of pupils fall within the Low attainment band compared to 11.4% nationally.
C. Social Deprivation:  The LA data pack for 2016 shows an IMD score of 31.7 (decile 3) and an IDACI score of 0.32 (decile 2).  64% of pupils live in the most 20% most deprived areas nationally and only 5% of pupils live in the 20% least deprived areas nationally.  The majority of our pupils (91%)  live in households where no-one has higher education and many parents have low levels of literacy and numeracy. We have more disadvantaged pupils than 96% of primary schools like us.
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
D. Attendance:  Absence for Pupil Premium Pupils for terms 1 – 4 in 2015-16 was 6.8% compared to a national average of 5.2%.  The persistent absence rate for Pupil Premium Pupils was 26.5% compared to a national average of 18.1%.  This figure does include one Year 6 refuser but the overall absence rate is still too high when compared to national averages.
E.

Chaotic Home Lives:  Many pupils have chaotic home lives and the school works closely with Tyne Gateway and the Troubled Families initiatives.  We have a number of children living in homeless accommodation and some that are fleeing domestic violence.  The school is a supporter of Operation Encompass.  We run a free breakfast club to ensure that all children have access to a nutritious breakfast enabling them to concentrate better in class and improve learning outcomes.  Some pupils have little or no support from parents for homework, reading or other school activities such as plays and concerts.


4. Desired outcomes

  Desired outcomes and how they will be measured Success criteria
A. To close the attainment gap in reading, writing and mathematics between our PP and non PP pupils in Year 6.  We currently have 55% FSM6 entitlement in Year 6. All PP pupils in Y6 to make at least expected progress and meet age related expectations by the end of KS2.
B. To improve outcomes for more able PP pupils across all Key Stages in school. More able pupils to exceed age related attainment levels in reading, writing and mathematics.
C. Continue to support specialist development and intervention programmes, one-to-one and small group work for PP pupils that are falling behind.  To buy-in specialist support services such as Educational Psychology as required. PP pupils’ progress at the end of each Key Stage is in line with peers.
D. Increase attendance rates for PP pupils in line with non-eligible pupils, reducing the number of PP pupils classed as persistent absentees. Overall attendance rates for PP pupils to improve in line with national and comparable to other pupil groups. 
E. Continue to support curriculum enrichment programmes for PP pupils including breakfast club, after-school provision, educational visits and activity breaks. PP pupils access all programmes throughout the year.

 

5. Planned expenditure

Academic year

 2016 -17

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

i. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

  • To close the attainment gap in reading, writing and mathematics between our PP and non PP pupils in Year 6.  We currently have 55% FSM6 entitlement in Year 6.

Continue to assess pupil progress at least termly.  Identify those pupils that are just below expected level and offer individual tailored support.

Although our KS 2 results were above national average for RWM, Reading and Mathematics the gap between PP and non-PP pupils remains significant in RWM combined and writing.  There is also a significant gap in average scale scores for Reading and Mathematics.

Book scrutinies and lesson observations linked to progress tracking

Greater challenge observed in lessons

Moderation of pupils’ work in school and externally

Termly assessment and data analysis

 

NGQ / SLT

Termly data analysis

Termly pupil progress meetings with Headteacher

 

  • To improve outcomes for more able PP pupils across all Key Stages in school.

Develop a programme of more challenging work based on the National Curriculum.

In-house data analysis shows that more able pupils are not being stretched as much as they could be.

RAISEonline data shows that “greater depth” scores are below national average.

As above.

Greater differentiation will be evident in pupil workbooks, marking and feedback will reflect points for pupils to demonstrate “greater depth” of subject understanding.
Staff CPD – levels of challenge.
Improved “greater depth” scores to be achieved in all key stages.

 

 

SLT

Termly data analysis

RAISEonline publication

 

Total budgeted cost

£8,672

ii. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Continue to support specialist development programmes, one-to-one and small group work for PP pupils that are falling behind.

To provide tailored support based on individual pupil need from a range of specialist programmes including:-

  • Reading Recovery Programme
  • Primary Writing Project
  • Pirate Writing Project
  • Talk4Number
  • BLAST
  • Six Quickies
  • Five Minute Boxes
  • Read Write Inc
  • Write Dance (EYFS)
  • Handwriting practice

Many pupils have little or no parental support which means that basic skills such as reading, writing and numeracy are only supported in school.

RAISE online clearly shows a significant gap in writing outcomes compared to national averages. 

The LA data pack and in-house data shows many pupils falling just below expected progress on a term by term basis.  If this goes un-checked they will struggle to keep-up with their peers when moving through a key stage e.g. from Y1 to Y2 or on transition to the next Key Stage e.g. KS1 to KS2. Pupils that are falling behind loose motivation and are likely to become Persistent Absentees perpetuating the problem.  The education of others in the class may also be affected as a greater proportion of Teacher time has to be allocated to pupil catch-up.

Teaching Assistants keep records of pupil progress from baseline to current on a term by term basis.

Progress of pupils to be in-line with their peers.

Pupils moving into mainstream activities and caught-up with peers at the end of the intervention programme.

A significant improvement in Writing compared to national average at the end of the school year.  Measure by RAISE online and LA data pack.

Review of interventions to ensure effective results for pupils in all Key Stages.

SLT and Phase Leaders

Individual pupil records on a term by term basis.

Overall review of intervention programmes on a termly basis i.e. whole pupil base improvement.

Annual review in September 2017 cross-reference RAISE online data with pupils and intervention programmes.

To ensure that pupils are ready to learn and engage in the learning process.

To continue to employ the services of a Learning Mentor to support pupils mental well-being in school.

 

Many pupils have chaotic and complex home lives.  Some pupils live in homeless accommodation and have witnessed DV in the home.

For pupils to succeed it is important that they come to school ready to learn and focused on learning not what is happening at home.

Our Learning Mentor is experienced in working with pupils to explore their feelings and emotions in a constructive way.  Having someone to talk to and confide in enables pupils to leave some of their “baggage” at the school door and to understand that what is happening in the home is not their fault.

Tracking pupil progress and attainment data for those pupils working with the Learning Mentor.

Fewer incidents of poor behaviour logged in the school log.

More positive feedback from the Pupil Voice about feeling safe in school and anti-bullying.

RW, KO and LY

Annually in April.

Total budgeted cost

£80,288

iii. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Increase attendance rates for PP pupils in line with non-eligible pupils, reducing the number of PP pupils classed as persistent absentees.

Letters home

Referrals to EWO for court action

Rewards for good attendance- ‘In It, to Win It’

The school is in the bottom 10% nationally for PA and overall absence rates for PP funded pupils.

The school has a number of pupils that have a pattern of non-attendance for family holidays.

Rewards encourage pupils to attend school as they do not want to let their peers down.

A member of staff in the office is responsible for attendance issues in the school.

A RAG monitoring system has been introduced with letters home emphasising the number of hours of education a child has missed out on.

The school will no longer be in the bottom 10% nationally.

JM

On a termly basis.

Continue to support curriculum enrichment programmes for PP pupils.

Provide a free Breakfast Club for pupils

Provide after-school clubs for pupils

Extra-curricular music lesson, choir and arts lessons

Offer a programme of educational visits and activities throughout the school year that stimulate pupils’ learning and life experiences

 

Research shows that pupils are more ready to learn if they have had breakfast. 

Breakfast and after school clubs enable pupils to socialise with their friends.

The school is in a deprived area with many parents dependent on low wages or benefits.  Many children have no cultural experience other than what is provided via the school.

Taking part in outward bound course builds self-esteem, confidence and team-working skills that help pupils throughout their lives.

 

Tracking individual pupil progress and attainment at the end of each school year.

Feedback through Pupil Voice regarding feeling safe in school.

Improved  “secondary ready” scores for mainstream Year 6 pupils.

SLT

Yearly in April

Total budgeted cost

£27,300

 

6. Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year

2015-16

i. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned
(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

To narrow the gap between PP pupils and non-PP pupils

One-to-one support
More effective monitoring

Gap has widened due to the high number of ARP pupils in Year 6 cohort.  Excluding these pupils the school KS2 results were broadly in line if not better than national averages.  This is directly related to effective marking and feedback and early intervention.

More work needs to be done to support More Able pupils across the school.

 Early intervention when pupils are just below expected level has proven an effective support strategy.

£20,876

ii. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned
(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

A programme of tailored support for pupils that are falling behind

  • Reading Recovery Programme
  • Pirate Writing Project
  • Talk4Number
  • Read Write Inc
  • Handwriting practice

 

 

Pupils have made accelerated progress, matching or exceeding their peers.

See impact statement on the website for details of pupil outcomes.

One to one and small group work are very effective tools to engage pupils that are struggling in a classroom situation.  Some pupils gained over 30 months of learning by the end of the Reading Recovery Programme and the First Class @ Numbers programme.

 

£45,326

iii. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned
(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Ensure that children are ready to learn on arrival at school

Continue to fund a free Breakfast and After-school Club for all pupils

Pupils are happy, feel secure and are ready to learn.

The role of the Learning Mentor is very important to ensure pupils’ mental well-being.

The Breakfast and After-school Clubs ensure children have a positive start and end to the school day.

£33,010


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